developmental editor

Do You Have a Healthy Relationship With Your Editor?

This blog post is a little bit different than my others. I was discussing this subject with a writer friend, and I realized this isn't really talked about enough. When choosing a developmental editor (DE), there are a bazillion articles and posts about what to look for: training, skill, rates. And while all of that is important, a writer-editor relationship is so much more than that. And it may or may not be a healthy one.

The Rewards and Pitfalls of Early Revision

In my last post, I mentioned why it can be beneficial to self-edit before we finish writing our first draft. If we leave big issues in the beginning, they're harder to fix later without breaking the story. Problems in a manuscript can snowball faster than your neighbor’s flooding bathtub leaking through your ceiling. 

Going back to fix a problem actually helped me move forward with a stronger story. But as we know, there are rewards as well as pitfalls to going back when we're trying to power through a manuscript.

Novel Revision: How to Fix the Big Stuff (Without the Woeful Cries) — 3 Steps

Revising a novel gives me the same dread I felt when writing the saggy middle of my story. I was standing at the beginning of an unending cracked desert and had no idea how to get to the other side. Mouth goes dry. As does every impulse. But in order to get from a crappy first draft to a polished manuscript, you have to go through the storm—the parts that hold your story together, the big stuff. Luckily, I've pieced this process into three steps that keep me sane.

Developmental Editing – Edits vs. Comments

Today I'm writing about developmental editing practices. Specifically, when to edit and when to comment - both tools of Track Changes. But navigating an entire manuscript can seem daunting when we're working with authors on a creative level. We need to get as close as we can to the content, live in the author's fictional world, without overstepping.

Mind Mapping Tools for Writers and Story Editors

Mind mapping can be a useful technique for writers to add to their writing process. What it comes down to is- how do we grasp information? How do we organize our thoughts and ideas? Do we need to?

My One-Year Blog Anniversary – And a New Website for Authors

I thought it would be perfect to blog about my new online space on the day I started officially blogging one year ago, March 27, 2013. Yup, it’s a very blogiversary day! Today I’m sharing how I recently changed things up for my website and blog.

What is Developmental Editing? A Diagram Explains It

I've been playing in Prezi lately because I've wanted to create a simple and hopefully easy-to-understand presentation to explain what developmental editing is. What do you think?

A Side to Developmental Editing Writers May Not Know: Thinking About Your Story Subconsciously

I submerge myself in authors’ stories. And while I’m in those stories, I’m thinking about them a lot—whether I’m directly editing them or doing something else. Those stories are still moving around in my mind. It’s unlike any normal reading experience.

Why Developmental Editors Give Superb Critiques

Critiques, also known as evaluations, are inherently part of a developmental editor’s work. We do them naturally as a way of organizing all the big pieces that hang together, deciding what a story needs, and drawing up an estimate.

What I Learned From WANACon – Part 2: The Devil is in the Details

In the spirit of NaNoWriMo, I thought it would be a great reminder to talk about “Little Darlings" as Kristen Lamb calls them. Little Darlings are the detailed pieces of our writing we stop and fuss over when there’s a million things wrong with our story’s foundation.