novel writing

On Writing: DNF (Did Not Finish) is Better Than a Disappointing Ending

One of the lessons I’ve learned over the years in blogging is not to write about a subject if someone already wrote it better. It’s like that time I re-told a joke, except I fudged the ending and didn’t do it justice at all. (And for the first time, you hear what polite laughter sounds like.)

So, I’m pulling your attention to a lovely blog post, where Jenny Cruise talked about story beginnings and endings in a linear structured plot.

Why You Should Self-Edit Before Finishing Your First Draft—Gasp!

As soon as you step outside in the morning, you see that raccoons overturned your garbage bins and left piles of trash all over your driveway. Cleaning it up left you frazzled and running late that you hit traffic. After an hour’s commute, you get to work and realize you forgot your security badge to enter the office.

3 Types of Protagonists That Can Sustain a Story –Which Type Do You Have?

If you read my previous blog post on how to create your cast of characters, then you're ready to concentrate more on what type of protagonist you’re dealing with.

Mind Mapping Tools for Writers and Story Editors

Mind mapping can be a useful technique for writers to add to their writing process. What it comes down to is- how do we grasp information? How do we organize our thoughts and ideas? Do we need to?

What is Developmental Editing? A Diagram Explains It

I've been playing in Prezi lately because I've wanted to create a simple and hopefully easy-to-understand presentation to explain what developmental editing is. What do you think?

An Easy Way to Organize Your Scenes Without Scrolling Back and Forth in Your Manuscript

There’s nothing more overwhelming than sitting down to a messy draft and preparing yourself for revision. You know there are problems, you may even know what to fix, but then all that text seems like a storm of activity ready to confuse and drown you. Are you ready for an easy way to organize your scenes?

Story Openings: Should We Start With Showing or Telling?

How do we start a story that’s been consuming us for weeks, maybe even months? Do we begin describing some backstory to give readers immediate context or do we throw readers directly in the middle of an action-packed moment?

On Writing: Showing vs. Telling and Why Writers Need Both

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard the mantra “show, don’t tell” and I always want to shake my fist and say “not always.”

Why Developmental Editors Give Superb Critiques

Critiques, also known as evaluations, are inherently part of a developmental editor’s work. We do them naturally as a way of organizing all the big pieces that hang together, deciding what a story needs, and drawing up an estimate.

What I Learned From WANACon – Part 2: The Devil is in the Details

In the spirit of NaNoWriMo, I thought it would be a great reminder to talk about “Little Darlings" as Kristen Lamb calls them. Little Darlings are the detailed pieces of our writing we stop and fuss over when there’s a million things wrong with our story’s foundation.