revision process

The Rewards and Pitfalls of Early Revision

In my last post, I mentioned why it can be beneficial to self-edit before we finish writing our first draft. If we leave big issues in the beginning, they're harder to fix later without breaking the story. Problems in a manuscript can snowball faster than your neighbor’s flooding bathtub leaking through your ceiling. 

Going back to fix a problem actually helped me move forward with a stronger story. But as we know, there are rewards as well as pitfalls to going back when we're trying to power through a manuscript.

Novel Revision: How to Fix the Big Stuff (Without the Woeful Cries) — 3 Steps

Revising a novel gives me the same dread I felt when writing the saggy middle of my story. I was standing at the beginning of an unending cracked desert and had no idea how to get to the other side. Mouth goes dry. As does every impulse. But in order to get from a crappy first draft to a polished manuscript, you have to go through the storm—the parts that hold your story together, the big stuff. Luckily, I've pieced this process into three steps that keep me sane.

A Side to Developmental Editing Writers May Not Know: Thinking About Your Story Subconsciously

I submerge myself in authors’ stories. And while I’m in those stories, I’m thinking about them a lot—whether I’m directly editing them or doing something else. Those stories are still moving around in my mind. It’s unlike any normal reading experience.

An Easy Way to Organize Your Scenes Without Scrolling Back and Forth in Your Manuscript

There’s nothing more overwhelming than sitting down to a messy draft and preparing yourself for revision. You know there are problems, you may even know what to fix, but then all that text seems like a storm of activity ready to confuse and drown you. Are you ready for an easy way to organize your scenes?

Beginnings and Endings: How to Make the Most Out of Your Scenes

Think of a person who’s had a long day of dropping her kids off at school, going to work, driving her kids to soccer practice, coming home to make dinner, putting the kids to bed, and then finally has an hour or two to herself before she has to go to sleep. Can your book keep this tired person turning the pages before bedtime?

Developmental Editing: How Does it Work? Are There Rules?

Developmental editing may be a job without grammar rules, but that doesn’t mean we as editors forge ahead with our own agenda. This line of work requires principles. Three main ones...